Bennett Hubbard – Study of a Jaguar At London Zoo

£480.00

1 in stock

Pencil and watercolour highlighted with white on paper. Inscribed in pencil; Zoological Gardens Regents Park, B. Hubbard, August 1851, (bottom left). Housed with a wash line mount in a gilt wood frame.

Image: 10 x 14in. (25.5 x 35.5cm.)
Frame: 22 1/2 x 18 1/4 in. (57.1 x 46.4 cm.)

Description

This watercolour was executed only 4 years after London zoo or the Zoological Gardens, as it was called then, officially opened to the public. It wasn’t until 1867 that the word ‘zoo’ entered the international vocabulary when it was made popular by ‘The Great Vance’, a famous Edwardian who sang:

” The ok thing to do on a Sunday afternoon is to toddle in the zoo.”

The Zoological Gardens opened in 1828 only to members of the Society, known as the fellows, and their friends. It was only later in 1847 that the zoo opened it’s doors to the public, for financial reasons.

A pupil of William Etty, Bennett Hubbard (1806-1870) was known to be an animal and sporting artist who exhibited seven works, spaniels and ponies as well as portraits, at the Royal Academy in London.

 

 

 

 

Brand

Hubbard, Bennett (1806-1870)

A pupil of William Etty, Bennett was known to be a sporting artist who exhibited seven works, spaniels and ponies as well as portraits, at the Royal Academy in London. Address: Louth, Lincolnshire.